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MTN Family Services

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Family Services Coordinator John Michael Segars, PharmD

 

As we continue to highlight our talented teams, we look next at the compassionate individuals who support families through some of their most difficult moments. Our Family Services staff members work with families whose loved one has the potential to donate an organ(s). To learn more about this unique and powerful profession, we asked Family Services Coordinator II John Michael Segars, PharmD, to answer these questions.

Briefly describe what Family Services Coordinators (FSCs) do.

  • Family Services Coordinators are the wonderful people who support families on the worst days of their lives. We are there to provide compassion and kindness during a tragic loss to help families in moments of grief. We approach families during this difficult time of losing someone, and we offer them the opportunity to save and enhance lives through organ, eye and tissue donation. Many families see this as the only bit of light on the darkest of days when they realize their loved one can be a hero.

How long do Family Services Coordinators typically spend with a family throughout the donation process? What type(s) of support do they provide?

  • In general, we can spend several hours with a family, but this can vary; sometimes our relationships with families last days, weeks or years, depending on the connection and aftercare provided. I think of our role as listeners. We provide grief support in every way, whether that be hearing family members tell their story, hugging them as they cry, making calls to help them find a funeral home so we can provide a path to next steps, etc.

Why do specially trained individuals approach families about donation instead of the patient’s nurse, doctor, etc.?

  • We have a Midwest Transplant Network Family Services Coordinator approach families because we want to keep a distinction between the care being provided by the hospital staff and conversations about next steps occurring once a death has taken place or a decision for comfort care has been made. We don’t want to put our hospital partners in a position of having a conflict of interest in any way.

How might Family Services Coordinators support families who are on the fence about donation?

  • I personally like to make a connection with the family and learn about who their loved one was. Let’s say Larry was a police officer who was passionate about serving his community and died while on duty. His family isn’t sure about donation. I may ask questions about him and how he lived his life. I’d bring it back to what Larry would have wanted. I’d ask his family if he was the type of man that helped others. I may ask them if Larry knew they were making a loving decision on his behalf to help someone else, would he be supportive of that decision? I’d also discuss recipients and how donation doesn’t just benefit the life or lives saved — it also enhances the experiences of that person’s family members and friends, creating a ripple effect of positivity in communities.

What is the one thing you’d want to tell someone who knows nothing about your work?

  • I would say that I work in organ, eye and tissue donation with the most amazing team on Earth because they make miracles happen. I have always felt so honored to be a part of the process that is connected to the phone call a patient will receive that will save his or her life. We work hard to honor our donors as the heroes they are to save lives of individuals we will never meet.

What are some typical degrees and/or career paths staff members pursue before joining the Family Services department?

  • We have myriad backgrounds in our department. Most common are social work, nursing and ministry/divinity, but we have a wonderful foliage of differing backgrounds in the Family Services department, from pharmacy to business to funeral directing, etc.

Have Family Services Coordinators’ roles shifted during the pandemic? If so, how?

  • We have increased the number of phone approaches we do, as families are not always allowed at the hospital due to coronavirus-related visitor restrictions. We also are now approaching families on COVID-19-positive patients so we can make sure we are offering the opportunity to save a life to anyone with an eligible gift.

Why should people say “yes” to organ, eye and tissue donation?

  • This is a very personal decision that should be right for each individual. For me, it is all about leaving a legacy of helping someone else. To this day, I get chills on my arms when a family brings up donation before we arrive onsite because it tells me that on one of their worst days, they are thinking of how to help someone else. In my job, I truly get to witness the very best of people.

Anything else you’d like to add?

  • We’re hiring! We’d love to add eligible, compassionate people to our family! View our current job openings here.